The Python Grimoire

The Grimoire does not cover Python 2.6 and 3.0. Contributions to fix this are most welcome.

grimoire /grimwaar/ (noun) ::= a book of magic spells and invocations. Origin: French, alteration of grammaire 'grammar'. A grammar is a description of a set of symbols and how to combine them to create well-formed sentences. A grimoire is a description of a set of magical symbols and how to combine them properly. It is sort of a recipe-book for magic spells. See also Grimoire

The core of the Grimoire was originally developed and released by Andrew M. Kuchling in May, 1999. However, it never reached a stage where Andrew felt that it was ready for publication, and eventually he withdrew it. Steve Ferg, however, had found the Grimoire very helpful as he was learning Python, and he persuaded Andrew to allow him to take over maintenance of the document in August, 2002.

In December 2004, Andrew and Steve released the Grimoire under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License 2.0 and RuiCarmo began hosting it at The Tao of Mac, where it lingered until Rui decided to re-cast it in TiddlyWiki format for ease of use.

TiddlyWiki is the work of Jeremy Ruston, and the current stylesheet and layout are based on enhancements by Clint Checketts.

Downloads

The Grimoire can be found here (Choose "Save Link As..." and open it from your hard disk).

Please do not link directly to the TiddlyWiki file, because the filename and location are sure to change every now and then. Link to this page instead, which is more permanent and more useful.

Revision History:

  • April 25th 2008: Upgraded to TiddlyWiki 2.3
  • April 14th 2008: Minor corrections.
  • September 22nd 2007: Eight version (upgraded to latest TiddlyWiki)
  • August 22nd 2005: Seventh version (overwrote the sixth by mistake). Minor changes.
  • August 17th 2005: Fifth version. Minor layout tweaks, started adding links to the Python online references.
  • August 16th 2005: Third and fourth versions with layout and content changes. I've actually started reading and validating the contents. Proofreaders are welcome.
  • August 15th 2005: First and second versions published.

There are also HTML and PDF versions available of Andrew and Steve's version.